The Iberian Peninsula is the large autonomous territory within Europe, isolated from the rest of the continent by the Pyrenees to the north and the Strait of Gibraltar to the south.

By definition, it is a coastal area, washed by the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Its coasts, of cliffs and long beaches, dotted with fishing and commercial ports, contrast greatly with a very different inner world, that of shepherds and farmers.

The Iberian Peninsula is a “mille feuille” of reliefs arranged in an East-West direction: high mountain ranges, the Cantabrian and Pyrenean chains to the north, the Central Iberian System and the Bética Mountain Range to the south; and mid-mountain areas south of Madrid, the Universal Mountains of Toledo and Sierra Morena. Among them, plains mainly dedicated to agriculture: continental regions of altitude such as the Plateau of Castilla-y-Léon to the northwest of Madrid and the Plateau of Castilla-La-Mancha to the southwest, and finally the alluvial plains of the great Iberian rivers, the Ebro to the northeast and the Tagus, Guadiana, Guadalquivir to the south of Madrid. Not forgetting the Douro River that flows from the Plateau of Castilla-y-Léon.

The peninsula enjoys a Mediterranean climate, with a continental variant in the interior and an Atlantic influence on its west coast.

Its geography is made up of a great variety of regions and territories defined by its distance to the sea, by the diversity of reliefs and climates, but also by the customs of its peoples.

The Ancients called it Iberia, the territory of the Iberians, the people of the Iber River, possibly the Tinto River in the province of Huelva or the great Ebro River south of the Pyrenees. Currently, formed by two sister countries that were the kings of the world between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, spearheads of globalization and relations with America, and now ignore each other: Spain, a giant and Portugal, smaller, cornered by the ocean.

The Iberian Peninsula and especially Andalusia have fascinated travelers since ancient times. Hispania was one of the most influential regions of the Roman Empire. After Al-Andalus was one of the lighthouses of civilization, a bridge stretched between East and West, and subsequently a source of wonder and sighs for future romantic travelers.

Sierras de Cazorla, Segura y Las Villas

Salzman black pine in the mountains of las Sierras de Cazorla, Segura y Las Villas.

Sierra Nevada

Snow capped Sierra Nevada, roof of mainland Spain.

Rio Jandula sierra d'Andujar

Rio Jandula in the Sierra d’Andujar.

The Iberian Peninsula is the large autonomous territory within Europe, isolated from the rest of the continent by the Pyrenees to the north and the Strait of Gibraltar to the south.

By definition, it is a coastal area, washed by the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Its coasts, of cliffs and long beaches, dotted with fishing and commercial ports, contrast greatly with a very different inner world, that of shepherds and farmers.

The Iberian Peninsula is a “mille feuille” of reliefs arranged in an East-West direction: high mountain ranges, the Cantabrian and Pyrenean chains to the north, the Central Iberian System and the Bética Mountain Range to the south; and mid-mountain areas south of Madrid, the Universal Mountains of Toledo and Sierra Morena. Among them, plains mainly dedicated to agriculture: continental regions of altitude such as the Plateau of Castilla-y-Léon to the northwest of Madrid and the Plateau of Castilla-La-Mancha to the southwest, and finally the alluvial plains of the great Iberian rivers, the Ebro to the northeast and the Tagus, Guadiana, Guadalquivir to the south of Madrid. Not forgetting the Douro River that flows from the Plateau of Castilla-y-Léon.

The peninsula enjoys a Mediterranean climate, with a continental variant in the interior and an Atlantic influence on its west coast.

Its geography is made up of a great variety of regions and territories defined by its distance to the sea, by the diversity of reliefs and climates, but also by the customs of its peoples.

The Ancients called it Iberia, the territory of the Iberians, the people of the Iber River, possibly the Tinto River in the province of Huelva or the great Ebro River south of the Pyrenees. Currently, formed by two sister countries that were the kings of the world between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries, spearheads of globalization and relations with America, and now ignore each other: Spain, a giant and Portugal, smaller, cornered by the ocean.

The Iberian Peninsula and especially Andalusia have fascinated travelers since ancient times. Hispania was one of the most influential regions of the Roman Empire. After Al-Andalus was one of the lighthouses of civilization, a bridge stretched between East and West, and subsequently a source of wonder and sighs for future romantic travelers.